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in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he said i think it's going to go past my lifetime. he was right. and so he resigned as executor, and sure enough, this litigation continued. finally, wound up in supreme court. it was resolved in 1852 in favor of the polish descendents your this is 26 years after jefferson's death. so what i'm confused about is how did he ever have that money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation
the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of which woman
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
rating. i've warned you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper tr
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
murder rates. we have lower murder rates in other parts of the country than even in europe. than even where you come from. but what has created a problem in the united states, is to say in cities and schools, those are areas where we're not going to allow them to defend themselves? >> what is the murder rate in great britain for the last three years? >> it's under 3 for 100,000. >> just give me a number. >> it's actually .3 per 100,000. about a tenth of what it is in your vaunted english bucolic country, sir. the fact of the matter with guns comes safety. if the guns are in the hands of the good guys. when you say the good guys can't have guns, the bad guys have a monopoly and horrible things sufficient as shootings at schools take place. >> the ar-15 as we've seen in the last three shootings, aurora, the shopping mall in oregon and now sandy hook, the preferred weapon for young men who want to transfer hundreds of bullets of rapid fire if you have the right magazines. the president has stated he wants to ban weapons like this. what is your view? >> i think we need to ban gun control
arabia, ecuador, all over europe. >> dear santa claus, my only have gabriella better. clerk learned their 9-year-old daughter had a brain tumor. to the make a wish foundation, she gets to travel to paris. but before going, this fourth had a selfless epiphanies. she asked for letters to santa claus because macy's donates a make a wish for letter the department receives. >> it might have felt really lonely otherwise. >> they blew past their goal of tens thousand. became 150,000, which more into more than to hundred thousand letters. afternoon, it took a moving company to deliver to macy's this avalanche of love. >> it's pretty incredible. despite arduous chemotherapy and radiation treatments, she was there for the remarkable announcement, the final total. 240,983 letters. make a wish has really touched me. >> the treatments altered her can hear herou strength in every word. we might have a bad day to day, but there's always a bright tomorrow. thank you. happy holidays. >> and i did ignited in a little aroundledrt with thed returned gift of hope.difficul macy's was so touched by the ha
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
of europe and partly because of this fiscal cliff. i also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the president believes he has higher ground under this. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public opinion on their side. if you talk to people in washington there is a sense that a
time so she takes her daughter on a tour on a ship in the tour europe. it gives her time to conflict -- contemplate. what happens is cleveland mrs. his love interest so he writes a bunch of love letters. he sent an agent of his homage vote out to intercept france's fulsome heading to europe and they deliver all these love letters. what happens is the love letters become public. they become public. people are fascinated with cleveland's romance but cleveland is kind of off the hook because in his love letters frances, probably like a lot of you, he he calls her nicknames in and terms of endearment, cupcake, pumpkin, whatever. many people in the press think that cleveland is trying to court the widow who is only a few years his junior and they don't realize it's frances. what happens is people are getting smart to do so as frances comes back from her european tour, the widow goes to the harbor report in new york but cleveland sends a ship to get frances, kind of like a swashbuckling johnnie depp movie, she climbs on the side of the ship and she gets on the presence boat and unbeknownst
around the globe, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 167% of your graduates. -- 16% of your graduates. as important as creating the kind of human talent that is needed in these key files that will drive innovation, then you know we're in trouble. i would correct one comment, there has been some of us chris on the democratic side and marco rubio and a senator from kansas we have put forward legislation long before the election that said let's look at this tall lent competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, those of us from the business world that have been talking about for decades. while we recognize we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science graduates, native born americans particularly but focus on losing the numbers in middle school on girls and minorities. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways we can can and will is if we change our visa policies. as a matter of fact, if we had visa policies and immigration policies in effect in the 1970's and 1980's that we had now we would not have had the g
popular surge. >> eastern europe after the war, it's a black hole, actually in european history, very few people know very much about it. one of the points of writing the book was to put together both work people have done in other langes and also to use archives and interviews to tell a story that hasn't been very well told. how it is communism took over the region, how is it done. >> how quickly after the end of world war ii did the iron curtain, communist take over europe? >> it actually happened quite fast in the sense that when he red army came into the region, they were already prepared. they didn't know how long it was going to take and didn't have a ten-point plan but they began trying to control key institutions from the beginning, including the secret police, and also the radio and various -- other parts of the society they considered important. that one from from '44 or '45. >> where were the strongest areas of resistance? >> probably in poland. there was an armed resistance, the partisans, who were operating from the woods, particularly in eastern poland, and they were -- >> l
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
migrated to brazil from northern europe to alleviate his seasonal depression. >> seasonal effective disorder does spell out sad. >> this was one sad little snowball when he migrated down to pra zil he forget to think about one thing, right now it's coming up on summertime. what does flaky have to do. >> might need to sit in a bowl of ice cubes. >> that would work. he wouldn't be able to move around and explore brazil. what flaky does is flaky finds shadows. >> basically pulls the vampire routine. flaky, if i have to say anything to you buddy, now is the season you should be around the snow and be around your snowball friends. come back from brazil. hope you had a nice vacation. come back. don't melt, flaky. >> don't melt! >> i'm about to show you two videos that geeks like me love. the first one, is pretty self-explanatory. ♪ >> know who that is? >> gandolph. >> on a unicycle, in portland, oregon. >> better be careful because his long flowy robe is getting caught in his unicycle wheel. >> who is this on a unicycle? it happens to be the unipiper well known. he has close to 6,000 li
the intellectual life and breakthroughs of the enlightenment in europe and scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other because why would you sacrifice with someone for whom you had no common interest, and you could find that your individual rights and your individual being had come from nature or god and therefore couldn't be taking away from the hand of a king or the hands of a mob in the this is the moment that he embodies. its hierarchical moment to be alive in that very hour, a hugely important so here you have jefferson who could kill a fly when he needs to and who could think of the most fundamental way when he needs to. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson obviously was try to restore him to his context as a politician partly because i think politics gets too bad of a wrap these days. it may deserve a city bad rap but i don't want to be overly optimistic. we don't have any other way to govern oursel
, particularly if you were in northern europe. cold, depressing. there was not a whole lot of hope. you know, today, we get beautiful poinsettias sent to us and we have flowers at christmas time. back in the day, they tpt have special delivery overnight -- they didn't have special delivery overnight. dave sort of diamondback time. >> so they said, until we get all those things, we'll set up a little wreath. it was really to mark hope in the coming season that there would be growth of crops and all that kind of stuff. originally, the wreath was made of some greenery, had candles in it. there would be four candles, one candle in the middle and it was looking ahead. >> it was a celebration of the winter solstice more than it was a celebration of christmas. they think the actual wreath that we are so familiar with comes from the ancient roman times when the aristocrats of the roman era would wear what we all commonly know as a wreath on their head. a crown on their head. >> like a crown. >> yeah. so they think that is where the wreath came from and then the wreath has come to symbolize a lot mor
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
off than those who had to work in the fields but i think that is a debatable subject. if europe fields laid you put in a grueling 14 hours a day but after work the night was your own. a house servant like paul jennings could be called upon any time to service those in the big house. of course for jennings the most galling part of it was when he had to go back to washington with dolley leaving his wife and children behind and after his wife died these are motherless children. i think that was his final motivating factor to say now, not later. yes, sir. >> one thing i noticed about your book is it seems to tie historical parks that don't appear to be related. the rescue of the great painting of george washington. it has occurred to me for a long time that by stating that in addition to the fact that it is a great work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> may
breakthroughs of the enlightenment both in europe and in scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other -- because why would you sacrifice for someone with whom you had no common interest, and you would find that your individual rights, your individual being had come from nature or from god and, therefore, could not be taken away by the hand of a king or the hands of a mob. and this is the moment he defines, he embodies. it's a remarkable moment. it was blissed to be alive in that very hour, humanly important. so here you have jefferson who can kill a fly when he needs to and can think in the most fundamental, far-reaching ways when he needs to. one hell of a combination. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson, obviously, was try to restore him to his context as a politician. partly because i think politics gets too bad a rap these days. it may deserve a semi-bad rap. i don't want to be overly optimistic
and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can make business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the only way to continually invest is make a profit. we are unable to invest in equipment capital accumulation increases wage growth decreases. >> there are a lot of big businesses that do okay. corporations are taxes at all. finding ways to be multi national. the
right now, europe the in a terrible recession. you've got huge problems or bigger problems in asia than we thought we were going to have. if we can get this right in the first half of the year, i don't think it will happen before the end of the you near. if we can do this right, we can bring in more revenue and reduce our costs and reduce what we're paying out to bring our debt into balance. i think it is a huge tunts for america that around the globe will make us proud and crealt jobs. it is tough but it is an opportunity and if the president gets it right, chi believe he will, we have a huge ability to see and acknowledge that revival that we've been waiting for. >> let me follow-up on the specific point on the affordable care act. this letter sentsdz by a republican governor. many of these ideas and combha that is what the republican governors said, indicating it should be up to the states to taylor their programs when it comes to implementing the affordable care otherwise known as the obamacare. should states have the flexibility? >> yes, that is what the president has said within r
to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these companies -- these countries no longer have much and common with each other. >> more with anne applebaum from "iron curtain." sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> president obama talks about friday's shooting in newtown, connecticut. >> on friday we learned more than two dozen people were killed when a gunman opened fire. most who died were young children with their whole lives ahead of them. every parent has a heart heavy with hurt. among the fallen more also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping their children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken today. we grieve for the families of those we lost. we keep in our careers the parents of those who survived. as blessed as they are to have children at home, they know their child's innocence has been torn away it far too early. as a nation we have endured far too many of these tragedies over the past few years. an elementary school, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless streetcorners. any of thes
to talk to them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school. but england, europe, undergraduate. so these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. maybe 80 people are i said i'm just a scared he to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking, and a student raised her hand, and she said, now checks and balances is very important in your constitution and the present checks -- who protects, who checks the coats? good question. not sure i had a satisfactory answer. [laughter] there is an answer. and another student raised his hand, and he said federalism is very important in america. but money goes to washington, and then it goes to the states with conditions. with grants and eight. doesn't this undermine federalism? in a student raised her hand and said now, chief justice john marshall was very much admired in the united states. for all his decisions popular when he wrote them? i said wait, stop. [laughter] i said, you knew i was coming. you
of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: the ask the senate proceed to a voice vote on the adochghts resolution. -- on the adoption of the resolution. the presiding officer: is there further debate? if not, all in favor say aye. those opposed say no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the resolution is adopted. mr. reid: thanks, mr. president. i ask further that the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table, that there be no intervening action or debate and that any statements related to this matter appear in the record at the appropriate place as if given. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to h.r. 1845. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: h.r. 1845, an act to provide a demonstration project providing medicare coverage and so forth. the presiding officer: is there any objection to procee
and europe and in asia. not as many in south america and africa. the images are so precise they can pick up a twinkle of light on a ship at sea. it can help them predict some weather patterns as well. i'm sure jacqui jeras will be taking a look at these pictures as we see how the earth looks overnight. back to you. >> thank you. a lot of early risers on the east coast. it's 35 degrees out. chilly outside. washington states's marijuana law takes effect today, allowing adults to have up to announce of the drug and bans the public use of marijuana. state officials will regulate farming, distribution, and selling marijuana in stores early next year. until then you can only purchase from a drug dealer. >> we would then be able to give clear direction to law- enforcement that if it's not licensed by the state of washington, it's fair game. >> it remains illegal under federal law. that means federal agents can still arrest people for it. and it is banned from the federal properties including national parks and military bases. >> it's 35 degrees, much colder than earlier this week. >> my goodness.
market. samsung with only 42%. samsung still leads by a wide margin in europe. two places where you can track santa. the web site of norad, the military command center. noradsanta.org. the other website is google. >> and you can play fun and games on that website. >> you can send a friend or relative a message. i rob nelson. >> fedex field is the place to be this coming sunday night. that's when the redskins will host the cowboys before the final game of the season >> . if the redskins win, they will clinch the nfc east. they are one win away from of a division title spanx to yesterday's victory against the eagles. rgiii was 16 of 24 for 198 yards as the redskins won their sixth game in a row, 27-20.. kickoff sunday night is at 8:20. should be a good time. >> the redskins -- for this now. touchdown. seattle quarterback russell wilson continues to keep pace with andrew luck and r.g. iii. wilson growing four touchdown passes in their defeat over san francisco sunday night. the seattle seahawks clinched a playoff berth with the victory. part the ravens sealed the afc north with a victory o
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